Vitola is Lamborghini’s New All-Electric Supercar

Image credit: Thomas Granjard (Concept Car)
Image credit: Thomas Granjard (Concept Car)

Lamborghini may have begun working on a new electric supercar. First picked up by German enthusiast group Autobild’s Youtube channel, Lamborghini’s new all-electric supercar, called the Vitola, is reportedly built on Porsche’s J1 electric framework.

As both Lamborghini and Porsche are owned by parent group VW Motors, it’s not outside the realm of possibility that Lamborghini would take advantage of tech being developed by Porsche. While the two motoring companies tend to have divergent design philosophies, they have shared technology in the past. Porsche’s Mission E vehicle is being developed on a modular framework dubbed “J1”. Aimed at high-end consumers, the Mission E looks to be competing with similar offerings from Tesla and isn’t slated for release until at least 2020. If the Vitola is being built on the same J1 framework, it’s safe to assume it won’t be released until after the Mission E.

Autobild claims the Lamborghini Vitola will do 0-60 MPH in a blistering 2.5 seconds. When compared with Porsche’s Mission E, which plans to do the same 0-60 in 3.5, it’s clear Lamborghini’s electric vehicle debut is intended to make a statement. The Mission E uses a pair of electric motors making 600 hp, while the nearest speed comparison in Lamborghini’s lineup, the Aventador SV, makes 740hp with a traditional combustion motor. Given these specs, it’s likely the Vitola will be pushing 800hp when it reaches production.

Image credit: porsche.com
Image credit: porsche.com

It’s also very likely that the Vitola will be a limited production run akin to the Centenario. Lamborghini often does limited releases to show off new technology or create unique performance vehicles not intended for a more widely available production run. Looking at past examples of limited production Lamborghini’s, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see the Vitoli price-tag reaching close to, or even higher, than seven-figures.

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